Hoʻōla

Hoʻōla 2017 
Maikaʻi Ke Anu I Waimea Lā


Mahalo to our sponsors
                             



Hosted by our very own storytellers
 Storyteller Kuʻulei Keakealani comes from a  multi-generational ranching family and has a rich understanding of wahi pana, which she will grace us with, through moʻolelo.
 Kumu Keala Ching is a Hawaiian cultural educator, composer, song writer, and spiritual advisor to many Hawaiian organizations. Kumu Keala lives and breathes aloha into his Hawaiian heritage with his strong presence and great heart. 


Featured Artist include

  
Lito Arkangel is working as a Musician/Entertainer & Lecturer, Lito believes he is making a bigger impact on the youth of Hawaiʻi by engaging his audiences through his passions on stage as well as in the classroom.




ʻEKolu Mea Nui
                                                     Kunia Galderia  |  Kevin Kealoha  |  Sonny Lim

ʻEkolu Mea Nui will be honoring this wahi pana with mele of Waimea




Mahalo to our sponsors: 






Mahalo nunui i ke kākoʻo

3 Strands Wood Works, Ahualoa Farms, Akaka Falls Farm, Alfred Berdon Farms, Alma’s Garden, Atebara Chips, Aunty Kana‘i’s Marinade, ʻAha Honey House, ʻAha Pūnana Leo, ʻAlohi Polynesian Dance Academy (Lani Isaacs)


Barefoot Farms Hawaii, Betty Jane Springer, Big Island Candies, Big Island Mechanical, Blue Hawaiian Helicopters, Botanical World Adventures


 Cherie, Okada-Carlson, Courtyard Marriott, Creative Arts Hawai‘i 


DOE Hawaiian Studies, Kūpuna Component Hawaiʻi Island, Donna’s Cookies, Doherty Chiropractic, Debbie Toko


Grace Flowers Hawaii, Gallery of Great Things, Gregor Salon


Hamakua Sacred Arts, Hawai’i Forest and Trail, Hawaiian Academy of Recording Arts, Hawea AhLoy, Healthwayʻs II, Hiʻilei Kawelo, Hina LLC, Hibred Ohana, Honopua Farms


Isaacs Art Center Gallery, Island Breeze Productions, Josh Polet-Yang


Ka ‘Aila Niu, Ka hālau hula o Kealaonāmaupua, Kailua Candy Company, Kamaka ʻUkulele, Kamehameha Publishing, Kanu o ka ʻĀina, Kealopiko, Keolani Coffee & Crater 


Lako Kula Designs, Lehua, Jewelers, Lilikoʻi Café, Lorna Akima, Mahina, Makua Coffee Company, Mamane Bakery, Mauis Makau, Mauna Lani Shops, Merrie Monarch Festival, Merrimanʻs Restaurant


Na Pua Restaurant, Nā Kālai Waʻa, Nā Mea Hawaiʻi, Nakamoto Farms, ʻOhana Maielua, Oshimas (Kona), Palms Cliff House Inn, Parker Ranch Store, Plantation Grill 


Ramona Noa, Rotary Club of North Hawaiʻi, Royʻs Waikoloa, Sam Choy’s Restaurant, Sig Zane Designs, Tepa’s Farm, Tommy Bahamas, Vivian Barton


Waimea Body Essentials, Waimea Hawaiian Civic Club, Waimea Hawaiian Homesteaders’ Association, Waimea Lion’s Club, Whittle Farms, Wishard Gallery, WOW Farms






Hoʻōla 2016 presents ʻAha "Nani Waimea Kuʻu One Hānau" 


Larry Kimura, often described as the “grandfather” of Hawaiian language revitalization in modern Hawaii, will be featured at three community events on Oct. 21 and 22 focusing on rare mele of Waimea. (COURTESY PHOTO/Special to West Hawaii TOday)

By Landry Fuller Special to West Hawaii Today

WAIMEA — Residents and visitors will have a rare opportunity to learn more about Waimea through mele and the Hawaiian language at two workshops and a concert next week at a two-day event called HO’OLA.

Waimea’s own Larry Kimura will be the master behind the story at all three events with a Nani Waimea Ku’u One Hanau — beautiful Waimea, my birth land — theme. An associate professor of Hawaiian language and Hawaiian studies at University of Hawaii at Hilo, he is often described as the “grandfather” of Hawaiian language revitalization in modern Hawaii.

Among Kimura’s most notable work, he was co-founder of the nonprofit Aha Punana Leo that established the first Hawaiian medium preschools in the 1980s, a cornerstone in language revitalization efforts. He spent 20 years creating audio documentation of the last native Hawaiian language speakers that have provided a vital connection for modern speakers.

The HO’OLA events are sponsored by Ka Ua Paliloa, the parent organization of Punana Leo o Waimea preschool and Alo Kehau o ka ‘Aina Mauna elementary school.

The first workshop will be held on Oct. 21 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Anna Ranch. Attendees can choose from two of four sessions led by Kimura and various musicians that focus on the Hawaiian language, Waimea’s tie with Queen Emma and Maunakea, wild cattle and the work of the paniolo, and early haole connections in the history of Waimea’s families. He will also share archived stories and recorded interviews he has done with residents from his personal collection.

“Our first enrollment was for teachers and now we’re opening it up to residents who may be interested in an intimate learning experience with Kimura,” said Pua Lincoln, president of Ka Ua Paliloa. “It’s a rare opportunity to learn from him because usually you would have to be in a high level language class at University of Hawaii at Hilo or in the graduate or doctorate program. This workshop will be for residents at all levels, even those who don’t know the language at all.”

On Oct. 22, an abbreviated, talk-story version of the workshop will be held at Kahilu Theatre from 9 a.m.-noon.

That night, a community concert will be held at the theater in honor of Kimura and his work. The show will include performances of Hawaiian music by Kainani Kahaunale and Lito Arkangel, as well as Kihei Nahale, Sean Naleimaile and Kamakoa Lindsey-Asing from Project Kuleana, to share mele with ties to Waimea.

“These charity events are a huge leap from our past school fundraisers but we wanted to give the community the opportunity to engage in the language and understand how important it is to us and where we’re from,” Lincoln said. “One of the reasons the indigenous language is still alive after almost dying in the 1970s is largely because of Larry. We want to honor him, and for him to know how much we appreciate him.”

Punana Leo o Waimea is the only preschool of its kind in Waimea using the Hawaiian Medium Education Program. Residents and visitors will have a rare opportunity to learn more about Waimea through mele and the Hawaiian language at two workshops and a concert next week. (COURTESY PHOTO/KA UA PALILOA)

Ivy McIntosh, a parent and board member for both schools, is also grateful for all that Kimura has done for Waimea.

“He has made big contributions as a musician and to our school and cause,” she said. “He gave us our name for Alo Kehau and the parents group. He’s very imprinted in our program and has been there every step of the way.”

Lincoln added, “His legacy is for language to continue to thrive in his community.”

The full-day workshop at Anna Ranch is $50 per person. The morning workshop at Kahilu Theater is $10 per person, with an Oct. 17 deadline. Concert tickets are $35 or $40 per person, and include a locally sourced pupu and dessert.

Anna Ranch workshop registration: Call Maluhia O’Donnell at 885-7166 or email maluhia@ahapunanaleo.org



Featured artists include,

Kainani Kahauaele began singing professionally and composing traditional songs (haku mele) as Hawaiian language curriculum for ʻAha Pūnana Leo, promoting the documentation of Hawaiian history through mele.





Lito Arkangel is working as a Musician/Entertainer & Lecturer, Lito believes he is making a bigger impact on the youth of Hawaiʻi by engaging his audiences through his passions on stage as well as in the classroom.



Kīhei Nahale-a      Sean Nāleimaile    Kamakoa Lindsey-Asing


Ho-a, Project Kuleana ~ Project Kuleana was created by three Native Hawaiian men who share the perspective that Kuleana is what makes music Hawaiian. A Kuleana to the ‘āina (land) and our strong ancestral connection to it. Project Kuleana aspires to increase the innate value of Hawaiian music and the performance of it to inspire people to reflect on one’s own Kuleana. 




Hoʻōla 2016 presents ʻAha "Nani Waimea Kuʻu One Hānau" 
This year we chose to honor ʻanakala Lale Kimura for his many contributions to haku mele and the revitalization on ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi with special emphasis on Hawaiian songs about Waimea.  

Larry Kimura is an associate professor of Hawaiian language and Hawaiian studies at Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. Often described as the “grandfather” of Hawaiian language revitalization in modern Hawai‘i, his work can be traced back to the conception of core foundational educational programs in the 1980s that launched the rebirth of the Hawaiian language.

Among Kimura’s most notable work, he was co-founder of the non-profit ʻAha Pūnana Leo that established the first Hawaiian medium preschools in the 1980s, a cornerstone in language revitalization efforts. He spent 20 years creating audio documentation of the last native Hawaiian language speakers, a vital connection for modern speakers. Kimura also helped conceive and now serves as chair of the Hawaiian Lexicon Committee to create new Hawaiian words.

Read the full article at  http://hilo.hawaii.edu/keaohou/2014/10/09/kimura-hawaiian-language/



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